Archives for January 2012

Arab Spring changes destinations of Saudi vacationers

Katatni said the party might seek to ban alcohol for Egyptians but allow it for tourists on hotel beaches. Essam el-Erian, deputy FJP leader, said when asked about the issue that it would be a “fatal mistake” to damage the tourist industry.

– Hassan Malek, one of the main financiers and business strategists of the Brotherhood, said he had reservations about dealing with Qualified Industrial Zones, set up under a deal implemented in 2005 that allows Egypt to export from the zones to the United States free of tariffs and quotas provided products contain a certain percentage of Israeli inputs.

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Arab Spring changes destinations of Saudi vacationers

Tutankhamun: The Golden King and the Great Pharaohs Now Open at the MFAH

The programme talks of “spreading and deepening” the understanding of sharia as a way to guide individuals and society, echoing comments by officials who say they do not want to impose sharia on an unwilling population.

– It says followers of other religions would be governed by their own laws on religious matters.

– Asked whether the party would seek to make it a rule for Egyptian women to wear the Muslim veil, FJP Secretary-General Saad el-Katatni said: “I cannot draft a law that says an unveiled woman will be forbidden from this or that … (but) I must make her feel that her punishment is in the afterlife.” Most women in Egypt already wear a veil.

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Tutankhamun: The Golden King and the Great Pharaohs Now Open at the MFAH

Moody’s downgrades five Egyptian banks; outlook remains negative

The Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) gained most seats in the first round of Egypt’s first democratic parliamentary elections for six decades.

Following are some of the views espoused by the Brotherhood and the FJP on the economy, security, political reform, religion, culture and foreign policy, based on statements by members and the party programme:

POLITICS AND RELIGION

– FJP and Brotherhood officials say they want to build a modern, democratic state based on Islamic sharia law.

– The FJP says in its programme that legislation should be based on the principles of sharia and implemented with the agreement of a parliamentary majority.

– The programme talks of “spreading and deepening” the understanding of sharia as a way to guide individuals and society, echoing comments by officials who say they do not want to impose sharia on an unwilling population.It says followers of other religions would be governed by their own laws on religious matters.

– Asked whether the party would seek to make it a rule for Egyptian women to wear the Muslim veil, FJP Secretary-General Saad el-Katatni said: “I cannot draft a law that says an unveiled woman will be forbidden from this or that … (but) I must make her feel that her punishment is in the afterlife.” Most women in Egypt already wear a veil.

ECONOMY

– Broadly, Brotherhood leaders say the group supports a free-market economy with a strong private sector.

– Many Brotherhood members have big business interests, including in consumer goods such as furniture and clothing. They say they seek to emulate the Turkish experience in terms of economic growth with a focus on boosting manufacturing and exports, but say that does not mean they wish to follow Turkey’s political model.

– The group has said it seeks to gradually expand Islamic banking in Egypt as an alternative to commercial banking that would lure investors, but would leave both banking options available to consumers.

– Hassan Malek, one of the main financiers and business strategists of the Brotherhood, has said: “We want to attract as much foreign investment as possible… This needs a big role for the private sector.”

– Officials have tended to sidestep questions about whether the party would, for example, seek to ban alcohol, a move that would deter tourists, a major source of revenues and jobs.

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Moody’s downgrades five Egyptian banks; outlook remains negative

Alexandria, Egypt

Alexandria was founded by Alexander the Great in April 331 BC. Alexander’s chief architect for the project was Dinocrates. Alexandria is the second-largest city of Egypt, with a population of 4.1 million, extending about 32 km (20 mi) along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea in the north central part of the country; it is also the largest city lying directly on the Mediterranean coast. It is Egypt’s largest seaport, serving approximately 80% of Egypt’s imports and exports. Alexandria is also an important tourist resort. It is home to the Bibliotheca Alexandrina (the new Library of Alexandria). It is an important industrial centre because of its natural gas and oil pipelines from Suez.
From the late 19th century, Alexandria became a major centre of the international shipping industry and one of the most important trading centres in the world, both because it profited from the easy overland connection between the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea, and the lucrative trade in Egyptian cotton. Alexandria was not only a centre of Hellenism, but was also home to the largest Jewish community in the world.
In 619, Alexandria fell to the Sassanid Persians. Although the Byzantine Emperor Heraclius recovered it in 629, in 641 the Arabs under the general Amr ibn al-As captured it during the Muslim conquest of Egypt, after a siege that lasted 14 months.
Alexandria figured prominently in the military operations of Napoleon’s expedition to Egypt in 1798. French troops stormed the town on 2 July 1798, and it remained in their hands until the arrival of a British expedition in 1801. The British won a considerable victory over the French at the Battle of Alexandria on 21 March 1801, following which they besieged the town, which fell to them on 2 September 1801. Mohammed Ali, the Ottoman Governor of Egypt, began rebuilding and redevelopment around 1810, and by 1850, Alexandria had returned to something akin to its former glory. In July 1882, the city came under bombardment from British naval forces and was occupied. In July 1954, the city was a target of an Israeli bombing campaign that later became known as the Lavon Affair. On October 26, 1954, Alexandria’s Mansheyya Square was the site of a failed assassination attempt on Gamal Abdel Nasser.

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Alexandria, Egypt

Winters In Egypt: As Cold As It’ll Never Get

To many people born and bred outside of Egypt, the term winter can trigger many mental images or memories that had been tucked away and long accustomed to. Those memories may be layered like a white caked-layer of snow or wet and heavy like floods of cats and dogs. Although most of us may not realize it, this sort of weather can give off a depressing, dark vibe. However, if you throw the same word, winter, into the hands of an Egyptian who has never been anywhere else to compare, the term stirs up completely different mental photographs and emotions.

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Winters In Egypt: As Cold As It’ll Never Get

Deals on Travel to Africa

Many Brotherhood members have big business interests, including in consumer goods such as furniture and clothing.

– They say they seek to emulate the Turkish experience in terms of economic growth with a focus on boosting manufacturing and exports, but say that does not mean they wish to follow Turkey’s political model.

– The group has said it seeks to gradually expand Islamic banking in Egypt as an alternative to commercial banking that would lure investors, but would leave both banking options available to consumers.

– Hassan Malek, one of the main financiers and business strategists of the Brotherhood, has said: “We want to attract as much foreign investment as possible… This needs a big role for the private sector.”

Read the full article here:
Deals on Travel to Africa